CV

MOST RECENT POST

January 2013-July 2015

  • Lecturer in Art History, University of Manchester (0.2 FTE)

Module leader: Ruin Lust: Visual Cultures of Decay from the Baroque to the Present Day (2014, year 3); Function, Fantasy and Victorian Architecture (2013, year 1); Victorian Babylons: Representing the Nineteenth-century city (2013, year 3) Co-convener: Cities (2013, year 1) Undergraduate dissertation supervisor (2014-15) Lecturer and module leader, Manchester International Summer School (2015)

EDUCATION

1995-2006: University of Reading

  • PhD: History of Art and Architecture Thesis: ‘Into the belly of the beast: spatial representation and London’s main drainage system, c. 1848-68’ (result: pass)
  • MA: Visual and Verbal Representation in British Culture 1840-1940 Dissertation: ‘Seeing and smelling decay: sanitary rhetoric in the 1840s and 1850s’ (result: pass)
  • BA (Hons): History of Art and Architecture (result, 2:1)

1993-1994: Architectural Association

  • RIBA part 1, Architecture (result, first year pass)

1987-1992: Wellingborough School

  • 4 A-levels (Art, Maths, Physics and General Studies); 9 GCSE’s (Math’s, Physics, Chemistry, Music, English Literature, English Language, French, Geography, Biology)

CAREER HISTORY

January 2011-December 2012: University of Manchester

  • Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow, Art History and Visual Studies, University of Manchester: 2-year project, ‘Function & fantasy: Victorian decorative cast iron’

October 2006-September 2010: University of Reading

  • Postdoctoral research fellow, Department of Typography and Graphic Communication, University of Reading: researcher for 4-year AHRC-funded project ‘Designing Information for Everyday Life, 1815-1914’

April-July 2010 & 2009: Birkbeck College, University of London

  • Sessional lecturer: designing and delivering a 10-week course on subterranean London; assessing students’ accredited work; leading study trips

March-December 2002: ArtBibliographies Modern, Oxford

  • Editor: abstracting literature on twentieth-century art; indexing; editing, writing; proofreading; managing freelancers

RESEARCH & WRITING INTERESTS

  • Visual culture in Victorian Britain
  • Architectural history
  • Urbanism and urban history
  • History of technology
  • Underground space and its representations
  • Everyday print in the nineteenth century
  • Ruins and ruination in visual culture
  • Future cities in art, literature and cinema

PUBLICATIONS

Books:

  • Dead Cities: Urban Ruins and the Imagination of Disaster (under review for publication in 2017)
  • Iron, Ornament & Architecture in Victorian Britain: Myth & Modernity, Excess & Enchantment (Ashgate, 2014)
  • London’s Sewers (Shire, 2014)
  • Into the Belly of the Beast: Exploring London’s Victorian Sewers (Spire, 2009)

Edited books:

  • Global Undergrounds: Exploring Cities Within, co-edited with Carlos López Galviz and Bradley L. Garrett (Reaktion, forthcoming 2016)
  • Function & Fantasy: Iron Architecture in the Long Nineteenth Century, co-edited with Peter Sealy (Ashgate, forthcoming 2015)

Edited journals:

  • ‘Architecture and Dirt’, coedited with Ben Campkin, special issue of the Journal of Architecture 12: 4 (2007)

Articles and chapters in edited books:

  • ‘Introduction: exploring cities within’ (with Bradley L. Garrett and Carlos López Galviz), in Global Undergrounds: Exploring Cities Within, ed. Paul Dobraszczyk, Carlos López Galviz and Bradley L. Garrett (Reaktion, forthcoming 2016)
  • ‘Introduction: architecture unbound’ (with Peter Sealy), in Function & Fantasy: Iron Architecture in the Long Nineteenth Century, ed. Paul Dobraszczyk and Peter Sealy (Ashgate, forthcoming 2015)
  • ‘Meta-ornament: iron and the railway station in Britain,’ in Function & Fantasy: Iron Architecture in the Long Nineteenth Century, ed. Paul Dobraszczyk and Peter Sealy (Ashgate, forthcoming 2015)
  • ‘Chernobyl Diaries: disaster, ruin, memorial,’ in Cold War Cities: A Memory Book, ed. Katia Pizzi and Majatta Hjetala (Peter Lang, forthcoming 2016)
  • ‘Londons under London: mapping neo-Victorian spaces of horror,’ in Neo-Victorian Cities: Re-Imagining Utopian and Dystopian Metropolises, ed. M. H. Kohlke and Christian Gutleben (Rodopi, 2015), pp. 227-45
  • ‘Modern geisterstadte: Pripyat, Ukraine – leben nach Tschernobyl,’ in Refurbished Future: Werte, Ressourcen and Strukturen – Erganzen Statt Ersetzen, ed. Christoph M. Achammer (Verlag, 2011), pp. 212-21
  • ‘Designing and gathering information: perspectives on nineteenth-century forms,’ (with Paul Stiff and Mike Esbester) in Information History in the Modern World, ed. Toni Weller (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), pp. 57-88
  • ‘Talking shit: a conversation between Bruno Rinvolucri and Paul Dobraszczyk,’ (with Bruno Rinvolucri) in Critical Cities: Ideas, Knowledge and Agitation from Emerging Urbanists, Volume 2, ed. Deepa Naik and Trenton Oldfield (Myrdle Court Press, 2010), pp. 241-52
  • ‘Mapping sewer space in mid-Victorian London,’ in Dirt: New Geographies of Dirt and Purity, ed. Ben Campkin and Rosie Cox (IB Tauris, 2007), pp. 123-37
  • ‘“Monster sewers”: experiencing London’s main drainage system,’ in Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths of Enduring Evil, ed. Niall Scott (Rodopi, 2007), pp. 9-32

Articles in academic journals:

  • ‘Traversing the fantasies of urban destruction: ruin gazing in Varosha,’ CITY 19: 1 (2015):44-60
  • ‘Victorian market halls, ornamental iron and civic intent,’ Architectural History 55 (2012): 173-97
  • ‘City reading: the design and use of nineteenth-century London guidebooks,’ Journal of Design History 25: 2 (2012): 123-44
  • ‘Petrified ruin: Chernobyl, Pripyat and the death of the city,’ CITY 14: 4 (2010): 370-89
  • ‘Dream reading? Designing and using Victorian gardening catalogues,’ Journal of the Printing Historical Society 15 (2010): 49-75
  • ‘“Give in your account”: using and abusing Victorian census forms,’ Journal of Victorian Culture 14: 1 (2009): 1-25
  •  ‘Image and audience: contractual representation and London’s main drainage system,’ Technology and Culture 49: 3 (2008): 568-98
  • ‘Useful reading? Designing information for London’s Victorian cab passengers,’ Journal of Design History 21: 2 (2008): 121-41
  •  ‘Introduction,’ (with Ben Campkin), ‘Architecture and Dirt’, special issue of the Journal of Architecture 12: 4 (2007): 347-51
  • ‘Architecture, ornament and excrement: the Crossness and Abbey Mills pumping stations,’ ‘Architecture and Dirt’, special issue of the Journal of Architecture 12: 4 (2007): 353-65
  • ‘Una rappresentazione di un ’ideologia dell’ improvement? Le mappe e il futuro delle fognature Londinesi, 1848-51,’ Storia Urbana 112 (2006): 113-39
  • ‘Historicizing iron: Charles Driver and the Abbey Mills pumping station (1865-68),’ Architectural History 49 (2006): 223-56
  •  ‘Sewers, wood engraving and the sublime: picturing London’s main drainage system in the Illustrated London News, 1859-62,’ Victorian Periodicals Review 38: 4 (2006): 349-78

Exhibition catalogues:

  • Designing Information before Designers: Print for Everyday Life in the Nineteenth Century, with Paul Stiff and Mike Esbester (University of Reading, 2010)

Other articles:

  • ‘The Thames Tunnel,’ Victorian Review 38: 1 (2013): 15-17
  • ‘Pripyat and the death of the city,’ Stadt Bauwelt 48 (2010): 14-19
  • Encyclopaedia of Consumption and Waste, contributing author (Sage, 2010)
  • ‘Designing information before designers,’ with Paul Stiff and Mike Esbester, Baseline 58: 5 (2010): 6-11
  • ‘The Victorian origins of information design,’ with Paul Stiff and Mike Esbester, Grafik 184 (2010): 47-51
  • ‘Designing information for Victorian London’s cab passengers,’ Ultrabold: the Journal of St Bride Library 7 (2009): 4-9
  • Phaidon Compendium of Graphic Design, contributing author (Phaidon, 2009)
  • ‘Designing information for everyday life, 1815-1914,’ with Paul Stiff and Mike Esbester, Ephemerist 141 (2008): 7-13

Book reviews:

  • G. A. Bremner, Imperial Gothic: Religious Architecture and High Anglican Culture in the British Empire 1840-1870 (Yale University Press, 2013), Visual Culture in Britain 15: 3 (2014): 372-74
  • Michelle Allen, Cleansing the City: Sanitary Geographies in Victorian London (Ohio University Press, 2008), Technology and Culture 49: 4 (2008): 1055-57
  • Jamie Benedickson, The Culture of Flushing: a Social and Legal History of Sewage (UBC Press, 2007), Technology and Culture 49: 1 (2008): 284-85

Published conference papers:

  • ‘A Victorian ironworld: cast iron, ornament and Brighton,’ in Nuts & Bolts of Construction History: Culture, Technology and Society, vol. 2, ed. Robert Carvais (Picard, 2010), pp. 565-72.
  • ‘Rational, magical or monstrous spaces? Press responses to London’s main drainage system, 1865-68,’ in Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths of Enduring Evil, ed. Niall Scott (Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2007)
  • ‘Representation and power? Constructing London’s main drainage system,’ in Studies in Urban History 31, ed. Lars Nilsson (Institute of Urban History, 2007)

CONFERENCE PAPERS & TALKS

Conference contributions:

  • ‘Social ornament: iron on the street,’ keynote paper, Historical Metallurgy Society Annual Conference, Stratford-upon-Avon, June 2015
  • ‘Dystopian ruin? London’s future submergence,’ Brave New Worlds: The Dystopia in Modern and Contemporary Fiction, Newcastle University, April 2015
  • ‘Traversing the fantasies of urban destruction: ruin gazing in Varosha,’ Narrating Ruin, Ruining Narrative: Co-Producing Sites, Materials and Stories, RGS-IBG International Conference, London, August 2014
  • ‘40 years later: ruin gazing in Varosha,’ Big Ruins: The Aesthetics and Politics of Supersized Decay, University of Manchester, May 2014
  •  ‘Ornament and obscenity: cast iron and Victorian public toilets,’ The Production of Ornament, University of Leeds, March 2014
  • ‘Londons under London: Neo-Victorian cartographies of horror,’ Neo-Victorian Cultures: The Victorians Today, Liverpool John Moores University, July 2013
  • ‘Ornament and transience: iron, decoration and the railway station,’ Rust, Regeneration and Romance: Iron and Steel Landscapes and Cultures, Ironbridge, July 2013
  • ‘Function & Fantasy: The Aesthetics of Iron Architecture’ conference session (organiser), 66th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Buffalo, USA, April 2013
  • ‘Ornament unbound: Victorian decorative cast iron,’ Composition and Decomposition, British Association for Victorian Studies annual conference, University of Birmingham, September 2011
  • ‘Ruin from below: mapping London’s subterranean nightmares,’ Imagining Spaces/Places, University of Helsinki, August 2011
  • ‘The city in ruins: notes from Chernobyl and Pripyat,’ Refurbished Future, 20th Industriebauseminar, TU Wien, Vienna, May 2011
  • ‘Petrified ruin: Chernobyl, Pripyat and the death of the city,’ Cold War Cities study day, Centre for the Study of Cultural Memory, Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, London, September 2010
  • ‘Give in your account: reading pre-Victorian census form,;’ Writing Design, The Design History Society Annual Conference, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, September 2009
  • ‘Petrified modernism? Chernobyl, Pripyat and the death of the city,’ 78th Anglo- American Conference of Historians, Institute of Historical Research, London, July 2009
  • ‘Useful reading? Designing information for London’s Victorian cab passengers,’ St Bride Library Conference, London, April 2009
  • ‘Reading for navigation: maps and London guidebooks in the nineteenth century,’ 77th Anglo-American Conference of Historians, Institute of Historical Research, London, July 2008
  • ‘Combatting “fraudulent space:” Information design for London’s cab passengers, 1832-1914,’ Fifth Annual Conference on the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility, Helmond, Netherlands, October 2007
  • ‘Architecture and Dirt’ conference session (co-organised with Ben Campkin), 60th Annual Meeting of the Society of Architectural Historians, Pittsburgh, USA, April 2007
  • ‘Rational, magical or monstrous spaces? Press responses to London’s main drainage system, 1865-68,’ Third Global Conference, Monsters and the Monstrous: Myths of Enduring Evil, Budapest, Hungary, May 2005
  • ‘Nobility and fear in the “public face” of London’s sewerage system,’ Seventh International Urban History Conference, Athens, October 2004
  • ‘Dialectic of construction/destruction: picturing London’s sewers, 1859-6,’ Fifth Annual Conference of the British Association for Victorian Studies, Keele University, October 2004

Exhibitions:

  • Designing Information before Designers (co-curated with Paul Stiff and Mike Esbester), Department of Typography & Graphic Communication, University of Reading, 22 February-15 April 2010; and St Bride Library, Bridewell Lane, London, 11-29 January 2010

Talks and lectures:

  • ‘Men at work: visualising subterranean labourers in mid-Victorian London’, Perspectives on Ford Madox Brown’s Work, Manchester Art Gallery, 26 November 2014
  • Big Ruins: The Aesthetics and Politics of Supersized Decay (organiser, chair and contributor), 1-day conference for the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in the Arts and Languages, University of Manchester, 14 May 2014
  • Apocalypse Now: Thinking about Ruins and Radiation (organiser, chair and contributor), study seminar for the Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester, 28 November 2012
  • Function and Fantasy: Decorative Iron and Victorian Architecture (organiser, chair and contributor), study day for the Victorian Society, Art Workers’s Guild, London, 24 March 2012
  • ‘Into the belly of the beast: exploring London’s sewers,’ This is Not a Gateway annual festival, Hanbury Hall, London, 23 October 2010
  • ‘Interactions with information: designing and reading in everyday life, 1815-1914,’ (with Paul Stiff and Mike Esbester), History of reading seminar series, Institute of English Studies, London, 22 March 2010
  • ‘What lies beneath? The underground city,’ Oxford Castle Unlocked public talks, Oxford, 16 July 2009
  • ‘Realizing “the Egyptian type of eternity:” sewage recycling in Victorian Britain,’ seminar series, Department of Economic & Social History, University of Glasgow, 23 October 2008
  • ‘Out of sight, out of mind: representing London’s Victorian sewers,’ Centre for Metropolitan History seminar series, Institute of Historical Research, London, 17 October 2007
  • ‘Bazalgette’s architect: the eccentric art of Charles Driver,’ The Victorian Society Winter 2006 Lecture Series, Art Workers’ Guild, London, 21 February 2006

TEACHING

  • October 2013-June 2014: 12-week first-year undergraduate module, 15 students, 3 hours weekly, Function, Fantasy and Victorian Architecture; co-convener, first-year undergraduate module Cities, 55 students, 3 hours weekly, Art History & Visual Studies, University of Manchester
  •  January-May 2012 & 2011: 12-week third-year undergraduate module, 26 students, 3 hours weekly, Victorian Babylons: Representing the Nineteenth-Century City, Art History & Visual Studies, University of Manchester
  • April-July 2010 & 2009: 10-week accredited course (equivalent to first year undergraduate level), 18 students, 2 hours weekly, Subterranean London: The View from Below, Birkbeck College, University of London
  • January-March 2010 & 2009: Contributor to third-year undergraduate optional module & co-supervisor/moderator of essays, Ephemera Studies, 8 students, 6 hours, Department of Typography & Graphic Communication, University of Reading
  • October-December 2009 & 2008: Contributor to first-year undergraduate module and co- marker of assessed work, History of Graphic Communication, 35 students, 5 hours, Department of Typography & Graphic Communication, University of Reading
  • January-March 2006: 10-week accredited course (equivalent to first year undergraduate level), 15 students, 2 hours weekly, Engineering and Art: Victorian Industrial Architecture, School of Continuing Education, University of Reading
  • April-June 2004: 7-week accredited course (equivalent to first year undergraduate level), 12 students, 2.5 hours weekly, The Slum and the Sewer: Sanitation and Space in Mid-Victorian London, School of Continuing Education, University of Reading
  • March 2004: Half-day tour of the Paris catacombs and sewers organized for 13 second-year undergraduate students at the University of Reading

RESEARCH & PUBLICATION GRANTS

  • October 2013: Award from the Paul Mellon Centre towards the cost of publishing Iron, Ornament and Architecture in Victorian Britain (£1500)
  • May 2010: Two-year Early Career Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust (c. £50,000)
  • October 2008: Award from the Paul Mellon Centre towards the cost of publishing Into the Belly of the Beast: Exploring London’s Victorian Sewers (£4402)
  • April 2008: Award from the Marc Fitch Fund towards the cost of publishing Into the Belly of the Beast: Exploring London’s Victorian Sewers (£1000)
  • January 2004 and January 2003: Jonathan Vickers Bursary from the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain (£6000 p.a.)
  • January 2003-December 2005: Reading University Faculty Studentship (equivalent to full AHRC funding for doctoral research)

MEDIA EXPERIENCE

  • April 2015: Contributor/interviewee, The Restoration Man (Channel 4)
  • May 2014: Contributor to radio broadcast on London’s sewers (Marketplace Productions)
  • April 2010: Contributor, Tunnel Vision (Resonance FM)
  • May 2006: Contributor, One Planet (BBC World Service)

5 thoughts on “CV

  1. Brighton bandstand. You say from the Phoenix Foundry in Lewes: is the company then J Every, whose name is seen for instance on the promenade shelters ? Incidentally, I could not find any name on the iron of the bandstand, let alone Macfarlane (to whom ‘Pevsner’, presumably wrongly, attirbutes it).
    See you I hope on the VS Study Day.

    • I spoke to the company that restored the bandstand and they thought it was definitely Every even though there were no foundry marks. Of course this makes sense given that all the other Brighton ironwork is by Every. I wonder where the Macfarlane attribution came from? Glad you can make the study day in March. Do you have any info on Every by the way? I can find next to nothing. All the best, Paul

  2. If you send me your email address, I can send you a sheet of material about Every’s that I picked up last week in Lewes.

    In the churchyard of St Anne’s, there is a fine series of cast-iron markers (horizontal, & v long) to the graves of the Medhurst (milling) family. They date from (or at least the dates of the deaths are) 1828-87. Locals assured me that this is Every work, but the first date seems a little early for him.

    The bridge in the town over the Ouse is also noteworthy. The upstream side has a cast inscription that is almost impossible to read. Pevsner says 1727 by Nicholas Dubois & rebuilt 1932, so the ironwork is a bit of a puzzle.

    The County Hall (l808-12) has some very fine cast grills & railings around the docks of the court-rooms, dating from the Victorian refitting. No details are available, nor are any marks to be found on the ironwork.

    Nicholas

    • It’s not deliberate, I can assure you! I just happen to live in Manchester at the moment. I love Liverpool & I’m sure if I was there more, I’d have much to say about the city.

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